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Vilma's Wellness

What is Adrenal Fatigue?

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For years you have been trying to improve your health, lose weight and feel full of energy. Science tells us that losing weight is 80% diet and 20% exercise.

Is body weight just a mathematical calculation of calories?

Most people still believe that body weight is simply a matter of calories in via diet versus calories out via exercise.

But the truth need not be too mysterious or perplexing. The explanation that frequently makes far more sense is Adrenal Fatigue [...] and for part 2 [...]

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Vilma's Wellness

How To Maintain a Healthy Colon

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Lets face it, digestive concerns aren’t a fun topic of conversation. In fact, many people have trouble talking to their own doctor about their concerns.

Others suffer in silent embarrassment, worry and discomfort over their rumbling and gurgling – the cramps, bloating, gas, constipation, or diarrhea.

The fact is that if your digestive tract isn’t operating efficiently, you have more to worry about than just your colon. Continue reading part 1 [...]part 2 [...] and part 3 [...]

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Vilma's Wellness

Fibrous Foods that are Good for Your Gut and Mood

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Most disease originates in your digestive system. This includes both physical and mental disease.

Your gut serves as your second brain…
…and even produces more serotonin – known to have a beneficial influence on your mood – than your brain does. It’s quite possible that this might be one reason why antidepressants, which raise serotonin levels in your brain, are often ineffective in treating depression, whereas proper dietary changes often help.

A big part of our emotions are probably influenced by the nerves in our gut [...]

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Vilma's Wellness

10 gut healing foods

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When I talk about the “gut”, I am really referring to the entire digestive tract. Along the path through the stomach and small and large intestines, anything you ingest can either nourish or degrade the digestive organs.

When your gut is unhealthy, it can cause more than just stomach pain, gas, bloating or diarrhoea.

Because 60-80% of our immune system is located in our gut. Gut imbalances have been linked to hormonal imbalances (ie, Thyroid disease), autoimmune diseases, diabetes, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, anxiety, depression, eczema, rosacea and other chronic health problems.

I believe that the gut is the gateway to health and the first step I take with all of my clients, regardless of their diagnosis, is to heal the gut.

I use a Detoxification Protocol (remove the bad, replace with good) combined with personalised sessions (repair by providing the nutrients necessary to help the gut repair itself), which is a simple approach to repairing your gut and restoring your body’s balance.

So what are gut healing foods?  Continue reading [...]

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Vilma's Wellness

Foods that help depression: eat these 7 foods to fight the blues

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Depression is no laughing matter. The number of people living with depression in England has increased by nearly half a million in three years, according to an analysis of NHS data.

Depression is a common mental disorder that causes people to experience depressed mood, loss of interest or pleasure, feelings of guilt or low self-worth, disturbed sleep or appetite, low energy, and poor concentration. Living with depression is difficult for those who suffer from it and for their family, friends, and colleagues. It can be difficult to know if you are depressed and what you can do about it.

Depression that does not respond to antidepressants may also be a sign of an undiagnosed thyroid disorder, usually hypothyroidism. Some mental illness, including depression, anxiety, and postpartum depression may even be driven by thyroid dysfunction. The role of thyroid in brain health has been the subject of speculation for over a century. As noted in a 1949 paper in the British Medical Journal: [1]

“[Since] 1888 the Committee of the Clinical Society of London reported on the mental changes observed in over 100 cases of Myxedema and noted the general retardation, sluggishness and slowness of apprehension, which was associated with insanity in the form of melancholia, chronic mania and dementia.”

A recent study in the January 2010 issue of JAMA concludes that there is little evidence that SSRIs (a popular group of antidepressants that includes Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft and others) have any benefit to people with mild to moderate depression, and they work no better than a placebo [2,3]

In cases of mild to moderate depression there are natural solutions that may help to restore your mood.

In cases of mild to moderate depression there are natural solutions that may help to restore your mood. Recent evidence suggests that good nutrition is essential for our mental health and that a number of mental health conditions may be influenced by dietary factors.

Natural measures for depression involve addressing negative emotions, improving your nutrition (including making sure you’re getting enough good omega-3 fats), getting regular exercise, and optimising your vitamin D levels.

Foods that help depression

Fish and walnuts

Eat wild salmon at least twice weekly or supplement omega-3 fatty acids with fish oil (like Forever Arctic Sea). Walnuts are one of the richest plant-based sources of omega-3 fatty acids. The brain is made up of fats and health ratios of omega 3 to omega 6 fatty acids are absolutely essential to happy mood and healthy brain function.

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(Dr. Gordon is the author of a new book called Unstuck: Your Guide to the Seven-Stage Journey Out of Depression.) While all omega-3 fats possess immune-boosting qualities, omega-3 fats from marine sources (EPA and DHA) are more biologically potent than omega-3 fat ALA found in plant sources such as flax seeds, and are more potent inflammation fighters.

Salt

Your body needs salt– Choose Unprocessed Salt! [4] Natural salt is in fact essential for life and plays a key role in helping nerve cells in your brain and body to transfer information besides many other important roles. If you want to find out whether you’re eating the proper amount of salt for your body, a fasting chemistry profile that shows your serum sodium level can give you a good idea, so that you can modify your diet accordingly.

Your ideal sodium level is 139, with an optimal range of 136 to 142. Use a pure, natural salt, such as Celtic or Himalayan salt, to add flavour to your food and stay away from refined table salt (your table salt is actually 97.5 percent sodium chloride and 2.5 percent chemicals such as moisture absorbents and iodine).

Animal Protein

B vitamins play big role in the production of certain neurotransmitters, which are important in regulating mood and other brain functions. Folic acid deficiency has been noted among people with depression. Vitamin B6, or pyridoxine, is the cofactor for enzymes that convert L-tryptophan to serotonin, so vitamin B6 deficiency might result in depression.

There is evidence that people with depression respond better to treatment if they have higher levels of vitamin B12. Animal meat and especially organ meat like liver from organic grass-fed animals is the best source of vitamin B. Turkeyis the best food we know of for its tryptophan content. This chemical stimulates serotonin production, which is a natural feel-good chemical your body produces. And if you are vegetarian or vegan, don’t forget to supplement with B vitamins.

Probiotics and Prebiotics

Did you know that stress affects the gut microbes, too? [5] Unbalanced gut microbes can contribute to depression.  Be sure you are taking a high potency probiotic daily and eating fermented foods. Healthy choices include lassi (an Indian yoghurt drink, traditionally enjoyed before dinner), fermented raw (unpasteurrized) grass-fed organic milk such as kefir, various pickled fermentations of cabbage, turnips, eggplant, cucumbers, onions, squash and carrots, and natto (fermented soy).

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Although I’m not a major proponent of taking many supplements (as I believe the majority of your nutrients need to come from food), probiotics are definitely an exception. If you do not eat fermented foods, taking a high-quality probiotic supplement certainly makes a lot of sense considering how important they are to optimizing your mental health (Forever Active Probiotic).‚Äč Continue reading [...]


I would love to hear your thoughts. Please comment or sent me an email with your experiences at www.vilmaswellness.com

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